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‘New’ car registration

CrispyCleen

CCCUK Member
So, as some of you may have read on my project thread, I have been operating under the miss understanding that, in order for me to register my 1970 C3 (imported in December), I needed to get the car MOT’d. Thanks to the guidance of fellow CCCUK members I have been corrected and I’m getting down to the nitty gritty of the V55/5.

So, my question. Is this........ enough for proof of age for Yvette (that’s her name, it fits, don’t ask)? What have you previously used as proof of age?

View media item 287
 

Kicks on 66

Administrator
Staff member
So, my question. Is this........ enough for proof of age for Yvette (that’s her name, it fits, don’t ask)? What have you previously used as proof of age?

View media item 287

Yes. The original title.

If you don’t have the title the DVLA will accept a covering letter indicating proof of age from a recognised Club.

Also as you have to send originals take a copy of everything!
 

Norm

CCCUK Member
You have some stringent rules there with regards to a year of a vehicle. If it rides like a '66, looks like a '66, run's like a '66, VIN says it's a '66, but you still need second and third party verification? Is there that much fraud and scamming going on with classic and antique automobiles? Just curious, seems so easy on my side.
 

Roscobbc

CCCUK Chairman
"Is there that much fraud and scamming going on with classic and antique automobiles? Just curious, seems so easy on my side"
Its not unknown Norm - I guess in a way with comparatively so few Vettes over here in the UK and Europe in value terms they are worth more to us than perhaps than to you guys over in the 'States (they cost us more to buy pro-rata). There have been vehicles over here that have either come over here from the 'States, or put together here and purported to a specific year - later found to have panels and parts from other years..........
The current 'scam' (if you want to call it that) over here is with late model salvage titled Vettes, Camaro's, Harleys etc etc coming over comparatively en masse into the UK (and presumably Europe). The 'sensible' and knowledgeable UK potential purchaser will enter the vin number of the vehicle he's interested in to Google and (thanks to your efficient vehicle recording network) it will immediately show up as a salvage titled vehicle. The prospective purchaser can then attempt to make his own enquiries as to whether the vehicle has been correctly repaired. The real problem comes from there being no link between the USA's recording network and the UK's home grown system. A disreputable seller will offer the vehicle for sale stating that its not on the UK's 'hit list' (which is true enough) but omitting to mention that the car was on the US's 'hit list'. There is nothing wrong with buying a salvage titled and subsequently repaired vehicle - it'll have to be at a reduced price though won't it? - as when the owner eventually wishes to sell the car prospective buyers doing their homework will know it was previously on the 'hit list' and naturally expect it at a cheaper price!
Flood damaged vehicles -
does the water ingress come back to spook and haunt the electrical systems in later years? (much like an early C4 from a wet State that has never been garaged and forever having electrical gremlins and problems with terminal blocks and other electrical connections)
 

Norm

CCCUK Member
I see your point about protecting the buyer, but it has always been buyer beware. So someone on your side buys a flood car but is not annotated as such. It's shipped over and the buyer wants to register it. Someone says, "oh no, it's a flood car, (without documentation), you can't have a registration." Then what happens?
 
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Roscobbc

CCCUK Chairman
No reason for the car not to be registered in the UK - if the car is more than three years old it will need a DVLA test certificate - one would presume that if an accident damaged car it will have been repaired correctly, enabling it to tested. It will however being an import avoid the UK's accident damage classification that will be normally applied by the automotive engineer employed by the vehicle owners insurers. When 'categorised' the vehicle will get certification from total irrepairable write-off, through major structural to light cosmetic damage. Reality is that many of us here in the UK may not have ever had a chance to buy such a vehicle if it wasn't for damaged and subsequently repaired imported vehicles.
 
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